strength


studylikeadoctor:

Getting organized for the 3 final subjects that are left to finish this term! 5 More exams and I’ll be done!!! 

studylikeadoctor:

Getting organized for the 3 final subjects that are left to finish this term! 5 More exams and I’ll be done!!! 

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Ten Traps of Studying →

studytip:

1.”I Don’t Know Where To Begin”

Take Control. Make a list of all the things you have to do. Break your workload down into manageable chunks. Prioritize! Schedule your time realistically. Don’t skip classes near an exam — you may miss a review session. Use that hour in between cla sses to…

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Shared Jul 16 with 141 notes + reblog
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lady-fit-ness:

Quick Tips for Studying from Textbooks 
Reading a chapter from a book is good in theory, yet in order to retain information you have to understand the material. These are some tips on the method that I use to learn from the textbook. 
Recalling information is the key to learning content. 
Keep a separate exercise book (or loose leaf paper under a tab in your binder) to copy down key points from the reading. Pay extra attention to headings, and bold or underlined words. Make your notes succinct, and where possible jot down the information in your own words. The aim is to be able to re-read it later to remind yourself of the key aspects of the content. 
Don’t highlight long sentences at a time, if you choose to even highlight in your textbook at all. Use a pencil to underline only the important material relevant to your exam. Save the highlighters for beautiful study notes. 
Turn to a fresh page and without looking at your notes or the reading, jot down the headings and key points from memory. Skim back over your notes to add anything of importance that you have forgotten. This is where the learning takes place - your memory retention will be dramatically boosted, saving you a heap of study time later on.
For complicated concepts that will require in depth study, track the page number next to the point so you can easily refer back to it later. 
After you have made these notes, take a short 5 min study break. Read the objectives section and answer the questions out loud. (If the objectives are not in question format, recall as much detailed information about the objectives as possible). 

Before starting to write notes/revise content before exams, you will be able to read over your notebook to get a brief outline of the content and stimulate your memory for each topic.  

This is an active approach to learning, and has been proven to increase memory retention and understanding of content. 
Good luck guys! Study hard, stay motivated and healthy. 
lady-fit-ness.tumblr.com 

lady-fit-ness:

Quick Tips for Studying from Textbooks 

Reading a chapter from a book is good in theory, yet in order to retain information you have to understand the material. These are some tips on the method that I use to learn from the textbook. 

  • Recalling information is the key to learning content. 

  • Keep a separate exercise book (or loose leaf paper under a tab in your binder) to copy down key points from the reading. Pay extra attention to headings, and bold or underlined words. Make your notes succinct, and where possible jot down the information in your own words. The aim is to be able to re-read it later to remind yourself of the key aspects of the content. 

  • Don’t highlight long sentences at a time, if you choose to even highlight in your textbook at all. Use a pencil to underline only the important material relevant to your exam. Save the highlighters for beautiful study notes. 

  • Turn to a fresh page and without looking at your notes or the reading, jot down the headings and key points from memory. Skim back over your notes to add anything of importance that you have forgotten. This is where the learning takes place - your memory retention will be dramatically boosted, saving you a heap of study time later on.

  • For complicated concepts that will require in depth study, track the page number next to the point so you can easily refer back to it later. 

  • After you have made these notes, take a short 5 min study break. Read the objectives section and answer the questions out loud. (If the objectives are not in question format, recall as much detailed information about the objectives as possible). 
  • Before starting to write notes/revise content before exams, you will be able to read over your notebook to get a brief outline of the content and stimulate your memory for each topic.  

This is an active approach to learning, and has been proven to increase memory retention and understanding of content. 

Good luck guys! Study hard, stay motivated and healthy. 

lady-fit-ness.tumblr.com 

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5 steps to a productive morning →

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royalparty:

5am study session 

royalparty:

5am study session 

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Don’t skip studying just because your friends do.
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studytwice:

How To Stop Procrastination by studytwice

Anyone can procrastinate. It sometimes just happens. And it’s sometimes not that easy to stop doing it. Here’s a detailed guide on how to get rid of it, with tips to combat five common procrastinating habits. If you’d like to know what procrastination is and how to know if you’re doing it, why not check out the previous poster: Procrastination.

Reason 1: You don’t feel well. You’re tired, hungry or are otherwise not feeling 100%.
Solution: If you’re tired, why not take a short nap? Just have a lie down for 90 minutes, and it’s likely you’ll feel much better. If you’re hungry, why not eat and drink something? A hearty snack or sandwich and a fresh glass of juice will do wonders. If you have a headache/stomach ache, why not take some light aspirin? It’s not the ideal solution, but it might make you forget about the pain!

Reason 2: You aren’t motivated. You don’t see the point in learning the material.
Solution: Math sucks, I know. Your AP English teacher is the worst, I know. Studying sometimes isn’t the most fun and can sometimes even be completely boring. But no one can change that for you, but you. Your Chemistry equations are unlikely to magically get super exciting overnight if you hate Chemistry. But in the end, studying will get you your degree, and get you a job and a house and food. If the lack of motivation persists, why not contact your student advisor/study counsellor? Maybe you can take different subjects that will motivate you.

Reason 3: You don’t feel good enough. It doesn’t matter if you study it once or if you study it a 1000 times, you’re just stupid, anyway.
Solution: I hated Math in high school. I had a Math tutor once a week to help me with the material, and I still failed my exams. By contrast, I got high grades in History and was one of the best students in my year. So was I just stupid in Math and brilliant at History? Not likely. More likely: I was studying the wrong way. I study well by repetition. In History, I made detailed notes and even summarized my summaries. In Math, I made detailed notes, but did only the required homework. So you’re not stupid. It’s likely you’re just studying the wrong way.

Reason 4: You don’t understand the material. You want to write an essay about Shakespeare, you really do, but you just don’t understand Romeo & Juliet. “Fatal loins”? WHAT ARE FATAL LOINS?
Solution: What type of subject are you having trouble with?

  • (1) A literary subject, such as a poem, play or novel. Solution: try reading the text by yourself and mark where you have problems. Why not visit shmoop.com? It provides study guides for most English-language works. If that doesn’t work, why not ask your teacher? Remember, they set you the material, so they’re likely to understand it!
  • (2) A beta subject, such as Chemistry or Math. Solution: try doing the equation or reading yourself and mark where you have problems. Why not visit khanacademy.org? It provides interactive videos and study guides for most beta subjects. If that doesn’t work, why not ask your teacher? Remember, they set you the material, so they’re likely to understand it!
  • (3) A linguistic subject, such as vocabulary or grammar. Solution: what are you having problems with? If it’s vocabulary, why not visit vocabulary.com? If it’s grammar, why not visit grammarbook.com? If you’re studying a foreign language, why not ask your teacher for help or resources? Remember, they set you the material, so they’re likely to understand it!

Reason 5: You have better things to do. Seriously. Besides, there’s always tomorrow.
Solution: We all get 24 hours to spend in a day. Of these 24 hours, you already lose 8-10 hours to sleep. If you’re a full time student, you’re likely to spend 6-8 hours in class. This leaves you between 6-10 hours to spend freely as you wish. Why not spend 15 minutes of those 6-10 hours studying? You can then go do something else for the remaining time, like watch your favorite TV show or eat. If you were to spend just 15 minutes each day, you won’t have wasted that much time. It’s just 15 minutes on a scale of 24 hours. And maybe the next day, you can spend 20 minutes, and maybe have your homework for that week fully done. Probably easier than you thought, wasn’t it?

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Six skills every law student needs to master →

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How to organize your college life →

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The best way to organize for college students →

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